If You Think You Understand Dogs, Then This Might Change Your Mind

Dog After Surgery Care Tips

It can be scary and quite troublesome for a dog and hid/her owner to have to go to surgery. Although the recovery process is uncomplicated, but it is the first few weeks after surgery that the dog must be provided with special care and attention. After surgery and in the next few days, the dog will find itself groggy, sleepy more than usual, cannot balance when standing or walking, and will have poor motor control. Most often than not, the 2 days after surgery is a crucial concern for the dog since he/she will more likely experience the following: nausea, vomiting, panting, loss of appetite and sometimes loss of bladder control. These are helpful tips on how to care for dogs after undergoing surgery.

Using a Dog Cone

Dogs, who undergo surgery or who are being treated on their wounds, are usually required to wear a cone, E-collar or Elizabethan collar, to prevent them from licking their wounds or from biting the fresh stitches on the wounds. Some dogs may not be like the cone attachment and will find ways to remove it; therefore, there is another alternative which is a special fabric clothing which can be attached in place of the cone and which can be difficult for the dog to remove.

Ways to Give Medication to the Dog

Giving medication to the dog can be a tricky business as dogs will easily dodge the medicine pill when it is mixed with the regular food. Knowing that dog treats are preferred by dogs, a special one like dog treat medication, where the medicine is concealed in it, can be given instead. If this will still not work, a pill gun which will forcibly put the pill into the dog’s throat, will do.

Proper Treatment of the Dog’s Wound

Once the dog is allowed to go home, the vet will give instructions on how to clean the wound with betadine or, in some cases, wash the wound with salt water, or cleaning a drain site 2-3 times a day or how to change bandages. Also, checking regularly on the wound, until it is healed, is required to see if there is a development of infection which is an excessive white or yellow pus.

Water Therapy for the Dog

Giving water more than the usual volume to the dog, after surgery, can help the dog from being hydrated. Attention must be given when water is given, since the dog might still be groggy and might droop his/her head while drinking and may cause his/her drowning.

Providing the Dog Extra Care

As soon as the anesthesia wears off, the dog will still feel groggy and sleepy and the effect of the wound pain will begin to be felt, so it would be advisable to put the dog on a comfortable, cool place for him/her to rest or provide a soft cushion to make him/her comfortable. One must give extra attention in keeping his/her wounded dog from other dogs so as to prevent these dogs from licking the wound.